Waterfall Model - Software Development

Source: Wikipedia: Waterfall Model


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Waterfall model

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The waterfall model is a sequential software development process, in which progress is seen as flowing steadily downwards (like a waterfall) through the phases of Conception, Initiation, Analysis, Design (validation), Construction, Testing and Maintenance.

The waterfall development model has its origins in the manufacturing and construction industries; highly structured physical environments in which after-the-fact changes are prohibitively costly, if not impossible. Since no formal software development methodologies existed at the time, this hardware-oriented model was simply adapted for software development.

The first formal description of the waterfall model is often cited to be an article published in 1970 by Winston W. Royce (1929–1995),[1] although Royce did not use the term "waterfall" in this article. Royce was presenting this model as an example of a flawed, non-working model (Royce 1970). This is in fact the way the term has generally been used in writing about software development—as a way to criticize a commonly used software practice.[2]

(cont. in Wikipedia article)

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